Deaf and Proud.. But what does it actually mean?

Deaf and proud, but how can someone be proud of something that is perceived as a ‘disability’ by a large majority (Not all :P) of the hearing society. What is there to be proud of exactly?

I personally think being Deaf and proud has a different meaning to each individual, after all we each have different experiences of being deaf. Some primarily uses BSL, some lip read, some are oral, or use SSE. Some of us grew up in the hearing world, attending mainstream school. While others grew up in the Deaf world and attended Deaf some schools, or had best of both worlds. We each have different negative and positive experiences, and all this adds up to our own unique feeling of being Deaf and proud.

In a sense I cannot give a definite answer …

For me, being Deaf and proud mean that I am proud of what I’ve accomplished despite the odds stack against me. I’m proud to be graduating from university after the nightmarish year I’ve had due to problems with my ears.  I’m proud to know sign language. The list goes on and on, but….Ultimately, I am proud to have learned to love my ears after hating them for so many years.  We cannot afford to hate something about us, as it will eat away at us.

So yeah! I’m Deaf and proud!

:D xx

Anonymous said: Hey Sasha! Not every uni got a disability office to go through with us what services we need. We have to tell them what services we want so it is hard for us to know what we want when we did not have any experiences with the services before. You are really lucky that you are able to access all these support in your country.

I’m guessing you’re in America?

Wow! That’s kinda sucks! I’m lucky to have the support but I don’t know the systems works where you are :/ I hope that you’ll get the support you need.

Anonymous said: Hey, Sasha! May I know what kind of support do you apply during Uni? I do not know what types of support to ask for.

You along with the university disability team/services with go though and find out what you need :-) (you’re from England???) it all starts there as everyone needs/support are different.
Hope this helps :-)

Deaf girl about the town with the favourite drink, raspberry mojito :-D

Sorting through my things at my mums, and found my old analog hearing aids! So I thought I’d give them a try and boy they were crap!! Firstly I’m too deaf for these now and the audio quality is even more crap than the digital ones I’ve got now :-P

Sorting through my things at my mums, and found my old analog hearing aids! So I thought I’d give them a try and boy they were crap!! Firstly I’m too deaf for these now and the audio quality is even more crap than the digital ones I’ve got now :-P

Anonymous said: Dear Sasha, thank you for your amazing blog! It makes me feel that I am not alone in my deaf journey. But, how do you stand the isolation? Even if ppl in the group knows your problem, they still keep chatting. And you have a hard time understanding so many lips. Do you keep interrupting conversation just to ask them to keep repeating what they say or wait till discussion over then ask them to repeat all over again or just ask them what is your task without knowing why you need to do the task?

Hi Anon,

Firstly, Thank you for taking the time to read my blog :)

In group setting I tend to nominate a friend that I would ask questions to or to ask them keep me up to date, rather than butting into group conversations :)~

Meet the newest addition to the family, Cookie. She’s my sister puppy and the cutest thing ever :-)

Meet the newest addition to the family, Cookie. She’s my sister puppy and the cutest thing ever :-)

Anonymous said: Thanks for your answer! But, I have just started being more aware and learning about my deaf identity after trying to be 'normal' as a hearing person for a long time. Thus, with my little knowledge, how can I educate other people when I myself do not know much? I am as clueless as the hearing people too how to interact with my 'deaf' self! - Worried X_X

The first person to educate is yourself, until learn and become more comfortable in your deaf identity. You will then be able to pass you knowledge onto others.

Try not to be too worried about other people :)

Anonymous said: When meeting ppl for first time, they treat you friendly as they thought you were normal. But, after introduction using paper and pen, telling them you are deaf and that they need to speak louder, they change their attitude being more wary or distance themselves as they do may not know how to handle this or think that is best not to be frens with this person to save themselves the trouble. How do you handle this kind of situation? - Worried x_x

Don’t be worried!

Firstly deaf people are normal :P People may ‘distanced themselves’ through the lack of knowledge of deafness and how it impacts an individual as we all have different range of hearing loss and needs that need to be met. What I do it educate them, breaking the ice so to speak :)

I’ve also said.. Its the fear of the unknown. Educating others is key to breaking down barriers, stereotype etc…

Hope this helps :)

When I make a prediction about where the conversation is heading, but end up being completely wrong

terp-life:

It’s like

image

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I do this when I’m lip-reading, trying to second guess where the topic is heading so I can be ‘lazy’ on the lip- reading haha!! and Boy do I get it wrong sometimes